TREE LIFE
May 2015

 

MASHONALAND CALENDAR

Saturday May 2nd (NOTE CHANGE OF DAY AND TIME): Botanic Gardens Walk: Meet at 9.00 am in the car park of the Harare Botanic Gardens. This walk will last for 1 hr 30 mins.

Sunday 10th May – Tree Society AGM at the Mukuvisi Educational Centre. Meet at 9.30 am and please bring a plate of eats to share for tea. There will be a braai after the walk in the woodland, so please bring meat to braai together with braai tools and chairs (if needed) and drinks. Remember there are likely to be ticks in the woodland, Ingram’s Camphor Cream is a good deterrent.

Saturday 23rd May – Visit to Rhett Butler’s garden.
Our fourth Saturday walk is a return visit to 25 Wavell Road, the extensive garden of Rhett Butler, where we expect to see some interesting indigenous trees and plants.

The Tree Society Committee is very happy to welcome Mary Lovemore. Mary will take over the responsibility of organising outings, a very necessary task! We look forward to many interesting outings.
– Ed

NEW LEADERS FOR TREE SOCIETY OUTINGS

Would anyone like to volunteer to become a leader for Tree Society outings? The committee will select from volunteers who will be given some training. Please contact the Secretary if you are interested.
– Ed

REMINDER: ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING OF THE TREE SOCIETY

The 65th Annual General Meeting of the Tree Society of Zimbabwe will be held at the Education Centre, Mukuvisi Woodlands on Sunday 10th May 2015 at 9.30 am.

Programme
9.30am Arrival, tea and snacks
10am AGM
11am Walk in the woodland led by Dave
Hartung.
12.30pm Braai

*** Note that this is one week earlier than normal ***

Any proposals/resolutions and nominations for office bearers (and any volunteers to be on the Committee) should be forwarded to the Secretary Teig Howson at teig.howson@gmail.com by Sunday 3rd May if possible, although proposals and nominations will be accepted from the floor.

AGENDA
1. Notice convening the meeting.
2. Apologies.
3. Minutes of the 64th A.G.M.
4. Matters Arising.
5. Chairman’s Report.
6. Treasurer’s Report.
7. Election of Committee Members.
8. Proposed amendments to the Constitution
9. Any Other Business.

TREE SOCIETY MEMBERSHIP
Membership for 2015 was due on April 1st. If you would like to vote at the AGM on 10th May please pay your $10 to Bill Clarke or Mark Hyde either before or at the meeting.

CHAIRMAN’S REPORT FOR THE YEAR 2014-15

I have pleasure in presenting my 14th and final annual report as Chairman of the Tree Society covering the year 1 April 2014 to 31 March 2015.

Outings: The regular Tree Society series of monthly outings continued and we managed to organise eleven 3rd Sunday outings; in the twelfth month we had Meg Coates Palgrave’s 80th birthday lunch. Eight of the 4th Saturday walks took place during the year. A number of walks led by Tom Muller were held in the Botanic Garden.
The outings are summarised in the following table:
Month; Main outing; 4th Saturday
April 2014;  Carolina Wilderness;  No outing
May;  Mukuvisi Woodlands (AGM);   Mukuvisi Woodlands
June;   Pamuzind;  Rhett Butler’s garden
July;  Imire Game Park;  Rob Jarvis’s garden
August;  Manda Hills, Concession;  John Lawrence’s garden
September;  Canon Kopje;  Val D’Or
October;  Mountain View Farm, Bindura (Ruth Kilner); No outing
November;  Lake Chivero Bird Sanctuary;  Monavale Vlei
December Val D’Or (Xmas social); No outing
January 2015;  Southern Cross Farm, Chegutu;  Karl Van Laeren’s garden
February;  Imire Game Park;  Ewanrigg
March; 80th birthday lunch for Meg Coates Palgrave;  No outing

In addition, in an arrangement with Reps Theatre, I led a walk in the Botanic Gardens on 14th December which was followed by a ‘high tea’ on the Tada Terrace at Reps.

Car-sharing and meeting at a central point was introduced at the suggestion of Tony Alegria during the year and has worked well.

The June outing to Pamuzinda was somewhat different in that it included a lunch which was served to us in comfortable surroundings of a thatched lodge. I think this was enjoyed by all that attended.

In addition to the regular monthly outings, there was a longer trip, to Chimanimani from January 28th to February 2nd, 2015. This visit to Chimanimani, which was organised by Bill Clarke, was attended by 46 people and was the largest outing in terms of numbers the Tree Society has had in recent years and possibly has ever had.

Once again, I would like to thank Meg Coates-Palgrave, David Hartung and Tom Muller for stepping in as leaders of our outings and Tom for continuing with the Botanic Garden walks. Thanks also to those who contributed write-ups of our outings and articles for Tree Life: the two Annes, Ann Sinclair and Anne Butler, John Lawrence, Isla Grundy, Meg Coates Palgrave and Karl van Laeren. Thanks also to JP Felu, who has continued his excellent ‘Tree of the Month’ series.

Membership: As at 31 December 2014, we had 119 members, of whom 102 were ordinary members, 3 honorary and 14 external.

During the year, there were no deaths among our membership but Rolf Hangartner, who was well known to many members and whose farm Canon Kopje, we visited twice during the year, died in a traffic accident. Our condolences go to his family.

Tree Mapping: Work on this project continued in the reliable hands of Maureen Silva-Jones.

Tree Life: Isla Grundy continued as an exemplary editor of Tree Life throughout the year and has been publicist for the Society. Compiling Tree Life is not an easy task and I am very grateful for her patience and attention to detail.

Finance: The financial position of the Society remains satisfactory. The accounts and balance sheet have been prepared by Bill Clarke and will be presented later in this meeting.

Website: The website has been kept up to date by Odette Lind and our thanks go to her for her hard work. The Tree Society Facebook group has shown an explosion of membership from 82 members in May 2013 to 433 members on 5 May 2014 and has now reached 1,245 as at 23 April 2015.

Scanning back numbers of Tree Life: This exercise in scanning Tree Lifes from 1994 and earlier years is being undertaken by Mary Lovemore. Eventually, these will appear on-line. Many thanks for Mary for undertaking this mammoth and time-consuming exercise.

Committee: Tony Alegria joined the Committee during 2014 and Richard Oulton resigned after 9 years on the Committee. Mary Lovemore joined in April and so the current committee consist of the following 7 people: Isla Grundy, Bill Clarke, Tony Alegria, Teig Howson, David Hartung, Mary Lovemore and myself. My sincere thanks go to the members of the Committee for their hard work and support on behalf of the Society.

Herbarium fumigation: Fumigation of the National Herbarium was carried out in June last year and discussions are underway with Delports to re-fumigate in the near future.

Cultivated Trees: Tony and I have continued to work on producing a checklist of cultivated trees.

Review of the Constitution: A long-overdue overhaul of the Constitution has been carried out by Tony Alegria and Bill Clarke with legal assistance and advice from Sheila Jarvis. The results of their work have been circulated to members and you will be asked to approve the amended Constitution later in this meeting.

Tree labelling: this has been pursued by Tony, both at the Botanic Gardens and at Ewanrigg.

Resignation as Chairman: As many of you will know, I have resigned as Chairman of the Society with effect from the date of this AGM and will also be standing down from the Committee. I have been Chairman of the Society since May, 2001 and have therefore completed 14 years. I must state that my resignation in no way implies any dissatisfaction with my situation; I simply feel that I have been Chairman for a very long period and the time to hand over the Chairmanship to someone else with fresh ideas.

The Society is in a strong position in terms of its finances and its membership and we have a very able candidate for Chairman and a very able Committee.

I do intend to maintain links with the Society and look forward to continue to lead outings from time to time, but perhaps not as frequently as I do at present.  I would like to add that my final 5 months as Chairman have been particularly noteworthy, comprising the trip to Chimanimani with its record-breaking numbers, Meg Coates Palgrave’s 80th birthday lunch and the forthcoming trip to Mozambique.

In conclusion 2014-2015 was a highly successful and active year for the Society. I wish it well in the future.

– Mark Hyde Chairman

GINKGO BILOBA

Ginkgo biloba, also known as the Maidenhair Tree, is a unique species and is the only taxon in the division Ginkgophyta – i.e. a monotypic taxon. The Ginkgo is a living fossil, (a term coined by Charles Darwin) which means it is recognisably similar to its fossils dating back 270 million years. Native to China, the tree is widely cultivated and was introduced early to the West by Engelbert Kaempfer, the first European to discover the species in the late 1600s. In 1771 Linnaeus finally named the tree Ginkgo biloba which translates into “silver plume with two lobes.”

Ginkgo biloba

Ginkgos are large trees, normally reaching heights of 20–35 m, with some specimens in China being over 50 m. The tree has an angular crown and long, somewhat erratic branches and is usually deep rooted and resistant to wind and snow damage. Young trees are often tall and slender and sparsely branched; the crown becomes broader as the tree ages. During autumn, the leaves turn a bright yellow and then fall, sometimes within a short space of time (one to 15 days). A combination of resistance to disease, insect-resistant wood and the ability to form aerial roots and sprouts makes Ginkgos long-lived, with some specimens claimed to be more than 2,500 years old.

Branches
Ginkgo branches grow in length from the shoot and most trees have regularly spaced leaves. From the axils of these leaves, spur or short shoots develop on second-year growth. Short shoots have very short internodes which means they may grow only one or two centimetres in several years and their leaves are usually not lobed. They are short and knobby and are arranged regularly on the branches except on first-year growth. Because of the short internodes, leaves appear to be clustered at the tips of short shoots and reproductive structures are formed only on them. Seeds and leaves are visible on short shoots. In Ginkgos, as in other plants that possess them, short shoots allow the formation of new leaves in the older parts of the crown. After a number of years, a short shoot may change into a long (ordinary) shoot, or vice versa.

Ginkgo biloba leaves

Leaves
Ginkgo’s leaves are unique among seed plants, being fan-shaped with veins radiating out into the leaf blade, sometimes bifurcating (splitting) to form a network, but never anastomosing (reconnecting). Two veins enter the leaf blade at the base and fork repeatedly in two; this is known as dichotomous venation. The leaves are usually 5–10 cm, but sometimes up to 15 cm long. The old popular name “Maidenhair Tree” was given because the leaves resemble some of the pinnae of the maidenhair fern, Adiantum capillus-veneris. Ginkgos are prized for their autumn foliage, which is a deep saffron yellow.

Ginkgo biloba leaves and fruit

Leaves of long shoots are usually notched or lobed, but only from the outer surface, between the veins. They are borne both on the more rapidly growing branch tips, where they are alternate and spaced out, and also on the short, stubby spur shoots, where they are clustered at the tips.

Reproduction
Ginkgos are dioecious, each tree being either male or female. Male plants produce small pollen cones with sporophylls, each bearing two microsporangia spirally arranged around a central axis. Female plants do not produce cones. Two ovules are formed at the end of a stalk, and after pollination, one or both develop into seeds. The seed is 1.5–2 cm long. Its fleshy outer layer (thee sarcotesta) is light yellow-brown, soft, and fruit-like. It is attractive in appearance, but contains butyric acid (also known as butanoic acid) and smells like rancid butter or vomit when fallen. Beneath the sarcotesta is the hard sclerotesta (the “shell” of the seed) and a papery endotesta, with the nucellus surrounding the female gametophyte at the center. The fertilisation of Ginkgo seeds occurs via motile (swimming) sperm, as in cycads, ferns, mosses and algae. The sperm are large (about 70–90 micrometres) and are similar to the sperm of cycads, which are slightly larger. Ginkgo sperm were first discovered by the Japanese botanist Sakugoro Hirase in 1896. The sperm have a complex multi-layered structure, which is a continuous belt of basal bodies that form the base of several thousand flagella which have a cilia-like motion. The flagella/cilia apparatus pulls the body of the sperm forwards. The sperm have only a tiny distance to travel to the usually two or three archegonia. Two sperm are produced, one of which successfully fertilises the ovule. Although it is widely held that fertilisation of Ginkgo seeds occurs just before or after they fall in early autumn, embryos are found in seeds just before and after they drop from the tree.

Cultivation
Ginkgo has long been cultivated in China; some planted trees at temples are believed to be over 1,500 years old. Because of its status in Buddhism and Confucianism the Gingko is also widely planted in Korea and parts of Japan; in both areas, some naturalisation has occurred, with Ginkgos seeding into natural forests. Sometimes the planted Ginkgos are male cultivars that have been onto plants propagated from seed, because the male trees will not produce the malodorous stench which acts as a temporary incapacitant, It attacks a person’s olfactory and/or trigeminal nerves and for this reason is sometimes called the Stink Bomb Tree.

In cultivation Gingko grows best in well-watered and well-drained environments. It is capable of sprouting from embedded buds near the base of the trunk (lignotubers) in response to disturbances, such as soil erosion. Old individuals are also capable of producing aerial roots on the undersides of large branches in response to disturbances such as crown damage. These roots can lead to successful clonal reproduction on contacting the soil. This is similar to the aerial roots of certain fig trees, once the roots touch the ground, they turn into “pillars” allowing the branch to extend further. These strategies are important in the persistence of Ginkgo, Remarkably, several very old trees survived Hiroshima, giving rise to the theory that the tree is also radiation resistant.

Distribution
Although Ginkgo biloba and other species of the genus were once widespread throughout the world, its range shrank until by two million years ago, it was restricted to a small area of China. For centuries, it was thought to be extinct in the wild, but is now known to grow in at least two small areas in Zhejiang province in eastern China, in the Tianmushan Reserve. However, recent studies indicate high genetic uniformity among Ginkgo trees from these areas, arguing against a natural origin of these populations and suggesting the trees in these areas may have been planted and preserved by Chinese monks over a period of about 1,000 years

Medicinal Use
Ginkgo is marketed in dietary supplement form with claims it can enhance cognitive function in people without known cognitive problems, but such claims are unfounded because it has no effect on memory or attention in healthy people. Ginkgo has been studied as a possible treatment for demential and Alzheimer’s disease with mixed results. Some reviews have concluded there is no good evidence supporting the use of Ginkgo in dementia, whereas others have concluded that it may help. There is also no good evidence supporting the use of Ginkgo for other ailments.

Status
The Ginkgo is listed in the IUCN Red List of Endangered Plants. Although it is cultivated and planted by humans, it is endangered, and at risk for loss of biodiversity because of propagation by cuttings rather than by seed, due to human preference for male trees.

If you would like to pay homage to this fascinating tree, a vigorous specimen can be found at Golden Stairs Nursery. It is situated behind the hardware store along a pathway leading to the coffee shop, the tree is next to an aviary with a power line running above its crown, forcing the owners to give it frequent haircuts. There is also a young tree planted behind the trampolines at Greenwood Park and another one in the Harare Gardens outside the restaurant in the car park area.

Happy Treeing !

Source: Wikipedia.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ginkgo_biloba

– Bilal Khatri

MEG COATES PALGRAVE’S 80th BIRTHDAY CELEBRATIONS

We had a wonderful lunch for Meg in the Harare Botanic Gardens on 15th March, with delicious food and pleasant company and a good time was had by all.

Meg Coates Palgrave (nee Stead) was born on 10 March 1935. She had an early interest in plants and this increased when she met Paul Coates Palgrave, just as the well-known Coates Palgrave family were completing Trees of Central Africa. This book had paintings by Olive, Paul’s mother and text by Keith, Paul’s brother.

The major book that Meg was involved in was the bible of southern African trees, namely Trees of Southern Africa which was published in 1977 by Struik. Kim Damstra once said that all South African homes have a copy of the Bible, Coates Palgrave and Shakespeare, which puts the book in very august company indeed.

Trees of Southern Africa was written by Keith Coates Palgrave. Keith was a teacher who became an Inspector of Schools; he spent weekend after weekend and all his leave and all school holidays in the Herbarium in Harare making notes on cards. This information was then typed by a typist, checked by Bob Drummond and then by Paul and Meg and retyped. Meg says “I don’t think Keith realised what an enormous task he had undertaken.”
Meg and Paul were involved in taking the photographs for the book. They also helped with checking text and proofs, and produced the list of English names.

Meg was later to spend the best part of five years in producing a completely revised edition of Trees of Southern Africa which appeared in 2002. This was also a gigantic task and led to a greatly expanded book. In 1982/3, Paul and Meg took the photographs for Everyone’s Guide to Trees of South Africa. After Paul’s death in 1983, Meg completed the task and with Keith wrote the text.

Meg was also involved in two other books: the Sappi Tree Spotting Lifer List, published by Jacana in 2004, which attempted to standardise English common names for trees in South Africa; Dictionary of Names for Southern African Trees, which appeared in 2011, for which Meg was a co-author with Braam van Wyk, Erika van den Berg and Marie Jordaan. This dictionary is a catalogue of the names of 2,100 species of trees, shrubs and woody climbers and provides both the scientific names and over 2,400 common names in thirty languages. [This is in fact a very major work]. Compiling the book was all done by email and the authors gathered together for the first time only after the book had been published – very much an example of modern long-distance collaboration. As an aside, I have been impressed by the way Meg has been able to use modern technology to further her botany. Not every older person has adapted to it.

Nearer to home, Meg published in 1989 the booklet A Guide to the Trees of the Mukuvisi Woodlands. This ingeniously simple booklet with photocopies of leaves proved a wonderfully effective way of identifying trees in the Woodlands and I well remember myself using it in the early 1990s a great deal. This was followed in 1996 by the book Key to the Trees of Zimbabwe which comprised keys for six different areas of the country. This book was enthusiastically received and Meg was presented with the Bob Rutherford Memorial Award in 1996 in recognition of her substantial contribution to conservation.

A trustee of the Bob Rutherford Memorial, David Tredgold, said ‘Her enthusiasm, dedication and passion for trees is infectious. She has provided so much interest and enjoyment to everyone with a love of the bush, not only in Zimbabwe but beyond the borders’. [I think we can all agree with that statement.]

In addition to her knowledge of Zimbabwean and South African trees, Meg has been actively involved at Catapu in the Sofala province of Mozambique for the last 10 years. There she has established, with the assistance of Ant White, a herbarium of specimens from Sofala and has greatly enlarged the knowledge of that poorly-explored area. Furthermore, a species of Gymnosporia, which is new to science, is about to be named after Meg. Meg is also working on a vernacular dictionary of the Sena tree names for the area.

In 2014, Meg received further recognition by being presented with the Marloth Medal by the Botanical Society of South Africa. The announcement was made by Ted Oliver at the final plenary session of the AETFAT congress in Stellenbosch in January 2014. The Marloth Medal is awarded to any amateur or professional botanist who has produced scientific literature of a popular nature to stimulate public interest in the indigenous flora of southern Africa. This is important recognition for all the work that Meg has done, and continues to do, on the flora of southern Africa.

In 2013, Meg joined the Flora of Zimbabwe e-flora project and since then has been a major contributor of images and records to the Zimbabwe and Mozambique websites. On a more local level, Meg joined the Tree Society in the mid-1970s and therefore she has been a member of the Society for 40 years (or half her life). She was Chairman of the Society for 2 years from 1981-82 and 1982-83. Since that period, apart from the times when she lived outside Harare, she has been active in the affairs of the Society.

As Chairman, I always enjoy the occasions when Meg leads our walks and I think the members do as well. So, how do we recognise a Meg in the field? One way is by the call, that we know so well, to ‘Pick a leaf’. This is so that you can learn about the trees by their feel, their smell, their taste, their hairiness, whether they have pellucid glands, whether they are 3-veined from the base or whether they have special characters like dendritic hairs. ‘Picking a leaf’ is one way to really get to know your trees.

A second phrase of Meg’s is: ‘all trees have labels’. People need to learn to read those labels and that is not always easy as we well know.

Meg has run Tree Identification courses in many countries in the region. For these courses she prepares keys to enable attendees to name, in a logical manner, the trees and compel the users to really look at the trees in order to obtain an accurate name.

So, how do we sum up Meg Coates Palgrave. I hope I’m not going to embarrass her too much at this stage!
I would mention the following:
Firstly, her enthusiasm and deep interest in trees and related aspects such as their taxonomy and conservation; Secondly, her tenacity and determination to complete tasks which would daunt others (for example the establishment of the herbarium in Catapu); Thirdly, her interest in passing her knowledge on to others through her courses, leadership of outings and her keys (Meg is in effect a natural teacher); Finally, her deep knowledge of trees and botany in general.

So a happy 80th birthday, Meg, and here’s to many more!

– Mark Hyde

Several members who were not able to attend Meg’s birthday lunch sent her greetings and tributes:

Dearest Meg
While most mortals are allocated three score and ten, your fourscore – according to Psalms – is a reflection of strength. May it last with as much vigour till your letter from the King (don’t worry, we’ll find one) in March 2035! Enjoy the day together with the spirits of all those happy souls (including Paul and so many others of the Tree Society) whose lives we have shared along the way. You are much loved, and not just by me! Kim Damstra

A very, very happy birthday to you Meg!! I’ll have a Castle Lite this evening in honour of your birthday. Amanda Mileson

Happy Birthday to a giant of Botany! Although we’ve never met, who doesn’t know and admire your name! My tree book is worn out and it’s still my favourite. Bruce Eitzen

Today is a very special day. Meg Coates Palgrave, one of the great wizards of botany in Zimbabwe celebrates her birthday. Happy, happy birthday Meg. Bart Wursten

The big Coates Palgrave is a constant companion because it’s such a comprehensive and reliable reference work. Where would we be without it? We salute you Meg. Fay Robertson

Happy Birthday to dear Meg! Doug and Tempe van de Ruit.

Colin Saunders: Please pass on to her our congratulations and best wishes. We hope that you have a splendid celebration in honour of “Mrs Tree”.

Rob Jarvis: I am afraid we won’t be able to attend as we have another engagement on that day. Please wish Meg our very best!

Dave & Sue Du Plessis: We hope you have a great celebration for Meg’s birthday. Please send her our best wishes.

 

Other members who were present also recollected their interactions with Meg over the years:

“I am not going to expound on Meg’s botanical achievements and exploits — these will be adequately covered — I just want to thank Meg, my friend of a great many years, for a very special relationship. Meg and I and Tony Ade grew up together at Nyanga — happy days.

This lady has amazing stamina, she can out walk most of us and then get back to base where the rest of us will sink into a comfy chair or bed; not Meg, she will down a couple or more beers and set to  sort out the day’s collections, everything meticulously recorded and beautifully pressed, then change the papers from the previous day’s collections — only then will she relax with several more beers or red wine. Her quest for knowledge and attention to detail is boundless.

Meg has had many curved balls bowled at her over the years and she has fielded each one with typical courage and aplomb — always dealing with trying situations with characteristic determination and courage. She is an enthusiast of note, always ready to share her vast knowledge – but, here I must add, equally, be sure never to ask a “silly” question or not hear an instruction when you are recording for her on a walk!

We salute you Meg and wish you many fruitful years ahead and an excellent time with your wonderful family in Kruger. We look forward to Catapu and then lots more walks and treeing and happy times. God bless my friend.
Mary Lovemore

I have very fond memories of Paul and Meg.

In 1963, when I was still a trainee Medical Laboratory Technologist in Salisbury, I was sent to work for 6 months in the hospital laboratory in Umtali. Paul was my boss and we were the only technologists in the laboratory at that time. Before I arrived, Paul booked me in at the Nurses’ Home where he knew I would be safe and well cared for. When I arrived, Paul and Meg welcomed me warmly. They made it plain to me that their home was always open to me.

During my time there, I was able to go home to Salisbury about once a month. Paul or Meg would always provide transport for me to the Umtali Railway Station and back again. On the way back to the Nurses’ Home they would often first take me to their home for a breakfast of fried bacon and eggs as I was too late for breakfast at the Nurses’ Home.

I have vague memories of Petri dishes with the chrysalises of butterflies and moths lying around in the home of Paul and Meg. These dishes were all strategically placed in the positions were they would get the optimum conditions of light and warmth. Some of the chrysalises were really beautiful and I was fascinated by them. It would appear that the interest of Paul and Meg shifted from butterflies and moths to trees with the passing of time.

My outstanding memory of Paul and Meg is that of a warm, kind, hospitable couple. I would like to thank Meg for all she did for me then when I was a young woman, away from home for the first time. I will never forget it.

I wish Meg everything of the best in the years that are left to her. May she enjoy good health, good friends and God’s richest blessings. Beryl Ely (nee Cockrell).

I have not met another woman who has given me so many hours of pleasure – that is in daylight hours. JP Felu

 

CABS HEAD OFFICE, HARARE 19 APRIL 2015

The Tree Society was to have visited Barwick on this day but this was cancelled because of the weather. However the group had its own walk in the grounds of CABS Head office and this is the write-up, by Sarah Roberts, of their activities.

The morning dawned clearer than of late and the brave were all at the CABs head office at ten to eight for a prompt departure to Barwick School. The abundant rain of the last few days had abated temporarily and it looked promising for our expedition to Barwick. We gathered in the car park, all ready to take off at eight, and wondered where our leaders were.
Tony arrived and announced that the message from Dave and Wendy was that it was still raining at our proposed riverine destination out on the Dyke so the outing was cancelled.
Disappointed, we chatted and discussed alternative plans, and Tony having told a joke or two to cheer us up suggested we look at what there was right there in the grounds of CABS. Now THAT was a great solution.

Having cleared with the security guard that it would be in order for us to walk “in the park” we were on our way. Suffice to say we had a lovely walk around the large grounds and found all the trees with which we are familiar, the names of which we gradually remembered as we moved along, indigenous, non-indigenous, newly named, common names, pronunciation discussions, and all the usual repartee which we so enjoy. Our pace was even fairly brisk with the beautiful lawns!

Amazingly, the large munondos remained despite the cultivation and lawns. Which Mahogany were we looking at, then there were more of them, in a thoughtfully planted row, various palms and even some wild life on the other side of the fence!!

The grounds proved extensive, and interesting, and even behind the boundary fence we found so many. We came upon fruit trees, former orchards of the original old houses of the neighbourhood. The Latin names very different from those familiar to us.

The border beds in the gardens thoughtfully planted with small trees, shrubs and flowers to attract birds, bees and butterflies which we saw in abundance. Pretty yellow ducklings and Egyptian geese added to our enjoyment.

At the end of a lovely two hour walk, some went home to work, few of us ended up having coffee or hot chocolate and biscuits on my verandah. Those off to Catapu, and those venturing to the Outward Bound with the Birders had important things to sort. Special time was had by those who found Raintree quiet and beautiful and had their picnic lunches there!
Certainly not a lost day, and thanks to Tony, Bilal, Dean and Teig for their input, and, of course, the odd smattering of botanical knowledge from the rest of us, Graham, Victor, Jan, Mary and myself!

– Sarah aka Mickey

Tree List at CABS, Sunday, 19 April 2015.

Croton megalocarpus, Acacia galpinii, Syzygium paniculatum – Cerise fruit, Newtonia buchananii, Acacia polyacantha, Acacia abyssinica, Ulmus parvafolia (China) serrated leaf, Acacia xanthophloea, Fever tree, Senna spectabilis, Ligustrum lucidum – Privet (Japanese), Solanum mauritianum, Leucaena leucocephala, Toona ciliata – Cedrela, Psidium guajava, Spathodea campanulata, Celtis africana, Casimiroa edulis – Mexican apple, Vitex payos – Chocolate berry, Triangle Palms, Schefflera arboricola variegata, Strelitizia nicolai, Albizia gummifera, Jacaranda mimosifolia, Gymnosporia senegalensis – Confetti tree, Julbernardia globifloraMunondo, Khaya nyasica / K. anthotheca, Rhus lancea – Willow leaf crowberry, Mangifera indica – Mango, Persea americana – Avocado, Morus alba – Mulberry, Acacia polyacantha, Bauhinia variegata, Trichilia emetica – Natal mahogany, Tabebuia chrysotricha – golden yellow flowers, Citharexylum spinosum – Fiddlewood/ Lady Chancellor, Ficus benjamina – Weeping fig, Phoenix canariensis, Phoenix reclinate, Callistemon viminalis – Weeping bottlebrush, Dracaena steudneri, Melaleuca armillaris – Tea tree, Antidesma vogelianum – Forest tassel berry, Erythrina lysistemon, Cussonia arborea, Acrocarpus fraxinifolius – Kenya coffee shade, Ficus benjamina variegata, Sapindus saponaria- Western soapberry, Adansonia digitata – Baobab, Bolusanthus speciosus – Tree wisteria, Brachystegia spiciformis, Brachystegia boehmii, Eriobotrya japonica – Loquat, Nerium, deadly Oleander, Abelia, Pyracantha angustifolia, Acalypha galpinii, Acacia sieberiana, Fraxinus americana – American ash, Duranta erecta – Golden dew drop or forget-me-not, Kigelia africana – Sausage tree, Cotoneaster sp.

 

MARK HYDE  CHAIRMAN

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

September Canon Kopje Val D’Or
October Mountain View Farm, Bindura (Ruth Kilner) No outing
November Lake Chivero Bird Sanctuary Monavale Vlei
December Val D’Or (Xmas social) No outing
January 2015 Southern Cross Farm, Chegutu Karl Van Laeren’s garden
February Imire Game Park Ewanrigg
March 80th birthday lunch for Meg Coates Palgrave No outing

 

In addition, in an arrangement with Reps Theatre, I led a walk in the Botanic Gardens on 14th December which was followed by a ‘high tea’ on the Tada Terrace at Reps.

Car-sharing and meeting at a central point was introduced at the suggestion of Tony Alegria during the year and has worked well.

The June outing to Pamuzinda was somewhat different in that it included a lunch which was served to us in comfortable surroundings of a thatched lodge. I think this was enjoyed by all that attended.

In addition to the regular monthly outings, there was a longer trip, to Chimanimani from January 28th to February 2nd, 2015. This visit to Chimanimani, which was organised by Bill Clarke, was attended by 46 people and was the largest outing in terms of numbers the Tree Society has had in recent years and possibly has ever had.

Once again, I would like to thank Meg Coates-Palgrave, David Hartung and Tom Muller for stepping in as leaders of our outings and Tom for continuing with the Botanic Garden walks. Thanks also to those who contributed write-ups of our outings and articles for Tree Life: the two Annes, Ann Sinclair and Anne Butler, John Lawrence, Isla Grundy, Meg Coates Palgrave and Karl van Laeren. Thanks also to JP Felu, who has continued his excellent ‘Tree of the Month’ series.

Membership: As at 31 December 2014, we had 119 members, of whom 102 were ordinary members, 3 honorary and 14 external.

During the year, there were no deaths among our membership but Rolf Hangartner, who was well known to many members and whose farm Canon Kopje, we visited twice during the year, died in a traffic accident. Our condolences go to his family.

Tree Mapping: Work on this project continued in the reliable hands of Maureen Silva-Jones.

Tree Life: Isla Grundy continued as an exemplary editor of Tree Life throughout the year and has been publicist for the Society. Compiling Tree Life is not an easy task and I am very grateful for her patience and attention to detail.

Finance: The financial position of the Society remains satisfactory. The accounts and balance sheet have been prepared by Bill Clarke and will be presented later in this meeting.

Website: The website has been kept up to date by Odette Lind and our thanks go to her for her hard work. The Tree Society Facebook group has shown an explosion of membership from 82 members in May 2013 to 433 members on 5 May 2014 and has now reached 1,245 as at 23 April 2015.

Scanning back numbers of Tree Life: This exercise in scanning Tree Lifes from 1994 and earlier years is being undertaken by Mary Lovemore. Eventually, these will appear on-line. Many thanks for Mary for undertaking this mammoth and time-consuming exercise.

Committee: Tony Alegria joined the Committee during 2014 and Richard Oulton resigned after 9 years on the Committee. Mary Lovemore joined in April and so the current committee consist of the following 7 people: Isla Grundy, Bill Clarke, Tony Alegria, Teig Howson, David Hartung, Mary Lovemore and myself. My sincere thanks go to the members of the Committee for their hard work and support on behalf of the Society.

Herbarium fumigation: Fumigation of the National Herbarium was carried out in June last year and discussions are underway with Delports to re-fumigate in the near future.

Cultivated Trees: Tony and I have continued to work on producing a checklist of cultivated trees.

Review of the Constitution: A long-overdue overhaul of the Constitution has been carried out by Tony Alegria and Bill Clarke with legal assistance and advice from Sheila Jarvis. The results of their work have been circulated to members and you will be asked to approve the amended Constitution later in this meeting.

 

Tree labelling: this has been pursued by Tony, both at the Botanic Gardens and at Ewanrigg.

Resignation as Chairman: As many of you will know, I have resigned as Chairman of the Society with effect from the date of this AGM and will also be standing down from the Committee. I have been Chairman of the Society since May, 2001 and have therefore completed 14 years.

I must state that my resignation in no way implies any dissatisfaction with my situation; I simply feel that I have been Chairman for a very long period and the time to hand over the Chairmanship to someone else with fresh ideas.

The Society is in a strong position in terms of its finances and its membership and we have a very able candidate for Chairman and a very able Committee.

I do intend to maintain links with the Society and look forward to continue to lead outings from time to time, but perhaps not as frequently as I do at present.

I would like to add that my final 5 months as Chairman have been particularly noteworthy, comprising the trip to Chimanimani with its record-breaking numbers, Meg Coates Palgrave’s 80th birthday lunch and the forthcoming trip to Mozambique.

In conclusion …

2014-2015 was a highly successful and active year for the Society. I wish it well in the future.

Mark Hyde

Chairman

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Ginkgo Biloba

 

Ginkgo biloba, also known as the Maidenhair Tree, is a unique species and is the only taxon in the division Ginkgophyta – i.e. a monotypic taxon. The Ginkgo is a living fossil,  (a term coined by Charles Darwin) which means it is recognisably similar to its fossils dating back 270 million years. Native to China, the tree is widely cultivated and was introduced early to the West by Engelbert Kaempfer, the first European to discover the species in the late 1600s. In 1771 Linnaeus finally named the tree Ginkgo biloba which translates into “silver plume with two lobes.”

 

Ginkgos are large trees, normally reaching heights of 20–35 m, with some specimens in China being over 50 m. The tree has an angular crown and long, somewhat erratic branches and is usually deep rooted and resistant to wind and snow damage. Young trees are often tall and slender and sparsely branched; the crown becomes broader as the tree ages. During autumn, the leaves turn a bright yellow and then fall, sometimes within a short space of time (one to 15 days). A combination of resistance to disease, insect-resistant wood and the ability to form aerial roots and sprouts makes Ginkgos long-lived, with some specimens claimed to be more than 2,500 years old.

 

Branches

Ginkgo branches grow in length from the shoot and most trees have regularly spaced leaves. From the axils of these leaves, spur or short shoots develop on second-year growth. Short shoots have very short internodes which means they may grow only one or two centimetres in several years and their leaves are usually not lobed. They are short and knobby and are arranged regularly on the branches except on first-year growth. Because of the short internodes, leaves appear to be clustered at the tips of short shoots and reproductive structures are formed only on them. Seeds and leaves are visible on short shoots. In Ginkgos, as in other plants that possess them, short shoots allow the formation of new leaves in the older parts of the crown. After a number of years, a short shoot may change into a long (ordinary) shoot, or vice versa.

 

 

 

 

Leaves

Ginkgo’s leaves are unique among seed plants, being fan-shaped with veins radiating out into the leaf blade, sometimes bifurcating (splitting) to form a network, but never anastomosing (reconnecting). Two veins enter the leaf blade at the base and fork repeatedly in two; this is known as dichotomous venation. The leaves are usually 5–10 cm, but sometimes up to 15 cm long. The old popular name “Maidenhair Tree” was given because the leaves resemble some of the pinnae of the maidenhair fern, Adiantum capillus-veneris. Ginkgos are prized for their autumn foliage, which is a deep saffron yellow.

 

 

 

Leaves of long shoots are usually notched or lobed, but only from the outer surface, between the veins. They are borne both on the more rapidly growing branch tips, where they are alternate and spaced out, and also on the short, stubby spur shoots, where they are clustered at the tips.

 

Reproduction

Ginkgos are dioecious, each tree being either male or female. Male plants produce small pollen cones with sporophylls, each bearing two microsporangia spirally arranged around a central axis. Female plants do not produce cones. Two ovules are formed at the end of a stalk, and after pollination, one or both develop into seeds. The seed is 1.5–2 cm long. Its fleshy outer layer (thee sarcotesta) is light yellow-brown, soft, and fruit-like. It is attractive in appearance, but contains butyric acid (also known as butanoic acid) and smells like rancid butter or vomit when fallen.Beneath the sarcotesta is the hard sclerotesta (the “shell” of the seed) and a papery endotesta, with the nucellus surrounding the female gametophyte at the center. The fertilisation of Ginkgo seeds occurs via motile (swimming) sperm, as in cycads, ferns, mosses and algae. The sperm are large (about 70–90 micrometres) and are similar to the sperm of cycads, which are slightly larger. Ginkgo sperm were first discovered by the Japanese botanist Sakugoro Hirase in 1896. The sperm have a complex multi-layered structure, which is a continuous belt of basal bodies that form the base of several thousand flagella which have a cilia-like motion. The flagella/cilia apparatus pulls the body of the sperm forwards. The sperm have only a tiny distance to travel to the usually two or three archegonia. Two sperm are produced, one of which successfully fertilises the ovule. Although it is widely held that fertilisation of Ginkgo seeds occurs just before or after they fall in early autumn, embryos are found in seeds just before and after they drop from the tree.

 

Cultivation

Ginkgo has long been cultivated in China; some planted trees at temples are believed to be over 1,500 years old. Because of its status in Buddhism and Confucianism the Gingko is also widely planted in Korea and parts of Japan; in both areas, some naturalisation has occurred, with Ginkgos seeding into natural forests. Sometimes the planted Ginkgos are male cultivars that have been onto plants propagated from seed, because the male trees will not produce the malodorous stench which acts as a temporary incapacitant, It attacks a person’s olfactory and/or trigeminal nerves and for this reason is sometimes called the Stink Bomb Tree.

 

In cultivation Gingko grows best in well-watered and well-drained environments. It is capable of sprouting from embedded buds near the base of the trunk (lignotubers) in response to disturbances, such as soil erosion. Old individuals are also capable of producing aerial roots on the undersides of large branches in response to disturbances such as crown damage. These roots can lead to successful clonal reproduction on contacting the soil. This is similar to the aerial roots of certain fig trees, once the roots touch the ground, they turn into “pillars” allowing the branch to extend further. These strategies are important in the persistence of Ginkgo, Remarkably, several very old trees survived Hiroshima, giving rise to the theory that the tree is also radiation resistant.

 

Distribution

Although Ginkgo biloba and other species of the genus were once widespread throughout the world, its range shrank until by two million years ago, it was restricted to a small area of China. For centuries, it was thought to be extinct in the wild, but is now known to grow in at least two small areas in Zhejiang province in eastern China, in the Tianmushan Reserve. However, recent studies indicate high genetic uniformity among Ginkgo trees from these areas, arguing against a natural origin of these populations and suggesting the trees in these areas may have been planted and preserved by Chinese monks over a period of about 1,000 years

 

Medicinal Use

Ginkgo is marketed in dietary supplement form with claims it can enhance cognitive function in people without known cognitive problems, but such claims are unfounded because it has no effect on memory or attention in healthy people. Ginkgo has been studied as a possible treatment for demential and Alzheimer’s disease with mixed results. Some reviews have concluded there is no good evidence supporting the use of Ginkgo in dementia, whereas others have concluded that it may help. There is also no good evidence supporting the use of Ginkgo for other ailments.

 

Status

The Ginkgo is listed in the IUCN Red List of Endangered Plants. Although it is cultivated and planted by humans, it is endangered, and at risk for loss of biodiversity because of propagation by cuttings rather than by seed, due to human preference for male trees.

 

If you would like to pay homage to this fascinating tree, a vigorous specimen can be found at Golden Stairs Nursery. It is situated behind the hardware store along a pathway leading to the coffee shop, the tree is next to an aviary with a power line running above its crown, forcing the owners to give it frequent haircuts. There is also a young tree planted behind the trampolines at Greenwood Park and another one in the Harare Gardens outside the restaurant in the car park area.

 

Happy Treeing !

 

Source: Wikipedia.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ginkgo_biloba

– Bilal Khatri

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MEG COATES PALGRAVE’S 80th BIRTHDAY CELEBRATIONS

 

We had a wonderful lunch for Meg in the Harare Botanic Gardens on 15th March, with delicious food and pleasant company and a good time was had by all.

 

Meg Coates Palgrave (nee Stead) was born on 10 March 1935. She had an early interest in plants and this increased when she met Paul Coates Palgrave, just as the well-known Coates Palgrave family were completing Trees of Central Africa. This book had paintings by Olive, Paul’s mother and text by Keith, Paul’s brother.

 

The major book that Meg was involved in was the bible of southern African trees, namely Trees of Southern Africa which was published in 1977 by Struik. Kim Damstra once said that all South African homes have a copy of the Bible, Coates Palgrave and Shakespeare, which puts the book in very august company indeed.

 

Trees of Southern Africa was written by Keith Coates Palgrave. Keith was a teacher who became an Inspector of Schools; he spent weekend after weekend and all his leave and all school holidays in the Herbarium in Harare making notes on cards. This information was then typed by a typist, checked by Bob Drummond and then by Paul and Meg and retyped. Meg says “I don’t think Keith realised what an enormous task he had undertaken.”

Meg and Paul were involved in taking the photographs for the book. They also helped with checking text and proofs, and produced the list of English names.

 

Meg was later to spend the best part of five years in producing a completely revised edition of Trees of Southern Africa which appeared in 2002. This was also a gigantic task and led to a greatly expanded book.

In 1982/3, Paul and Meg took the photographs for Everyone’s Guide to Trees of South Africa. After Paul’s death in 1983, Meg completed the task and with Keith wrote the text.

 

Meg was also involved in two other books: the Sappi Tree Spotting Lifer List, published by Jacana in 2004, which attempted to standardise English common names for trees in South Africa; Dictionary of Names for Southern African Trees, which appeared in 2011, for which Meg was a co-author with Braam van Wyk, Erika van den Berg and Marie Jordaan. This dictionary is a catalogue of the names of 2,100 species of trees, shrubs and woody climbers and provides both the scientific names and over 2,400 common names in thirty languages. [This is in fact a very major work]. Compiling the book was all done by email and the authors gathered together for the first time only after the book had been published – very much an example of modern long-distance collaboration. As an aside, I have been impressed by the way Meg has been able to use modern technology to further her botany. Not every older person has adapted to it.

 

Nearer to home, Meg published in 1989 the booklet A Guide to the Trees of the Mukuvisi Woodlands. This ingeniously simple booklet with photocopies of leaves proved a wonderfully effective way of identifying trees in the Woodlands and I well remember myself using it in the early 1990s a great deal. This was followed in 1996 by the book Key to the Trees of Zimbabwe which comprised keys for six different areas of the country. This book was enthusiastically received and Meg was presented with the Bob Rutherford Memorial Award in 1996 in recognition of her substantial contribution to conservation.

 

A trustee of the Bob Rutherford Memorial, David Tredgold, said ‘Her enthusiasm, dedication and passion for trees is infectious. She has provided so much interest and enjoyment to everyone with a love of the bush, not only in Zimbabwe but beyond the borders’. [I think we can all agree with that statement.]

 

In addition to her knowledge of Zimbabwean and South African trees, Meg has been actively involved at Catapu in the Sofala province of Mozambique for the last 10 years. There she has established, with the assistance of Ant White, a herbarium of specimens from Sofala and has greatly enlarged the knowledge of that poorly-explored area. Furthermore, a species of Gymnosporia, which is new to science, is about to be named after Meg. Meg is also working on a vernacular dictionary of the Sena tree names for the area.

 

In 2014, Meg received further recognition by being presented with the Marloth Medal by the Botanical Society of South Africa. The announcement was made by Ted Oliver at the final plenary session of the AETFAT congress in Stellenbosch in January 2014. The Marloth Medal is awarded to any amateur or professional botanist who has produced scientific literature of a popular nature to stimulate public interest in the indigenous flora of southern Africa. This is important recognition for all the work that Meg has done, and continues to do, on the flora of southern Africa.

 

In 2013, Meg joined the Flora of Zimbabwe e-flora project and since then has been a major contributor of images and records to the Zimbabwe and Mozambique websites. On a more local level, Meg joined the Tree Society in the mid-1970s and therefore she has been a member of the Society for 40 years (or half her life). She was Chairman of the Society for 2 years from 1981-82 and 1982-83. Since that period, apart from the times when she lived outside Harare, she has been active in the affairs of the Society.

 

As Chairman, I always enjoy the occasions when Meg leads our walks and I think the members do as well. So, how do we recognise a Meg in the field? One way is by the call, that we know so well, to ‘Pick a leaf’. This is so that you can learn about the trees by their feel, their smell, their taste, their hairiness, whether they have pellucid glands, whether they are 3-veined from the base or whether they have special characters like dendritic hairs. ‘Picking a leaf’ is one way to really get to know your trees.

 

A second phrase of Meg’s is: ‘all trees have labels’. People need to learn to read those labels and that is not always easy as we well know.

Meg has run Tree Identification courses in many countries in the region. For these courses she prepares keys to enable attendees to name, in a logical manner, the trees and compel the users to really look at the trees in order to obtain an accurate name.

So, how do we sum up Meg Coates Palgrave. I hope I’m not going to embarrass her too much at this stage!

I would mention the following:

Firstly, her enthusiasm and deep interest in trees and related aspects such as their taxonomy and conservation; Secondly, her tenacity and determination to complete tasks which would daunt others (for example the establishment of the herbarium in Catapu); Thirdly, her interest in passing her knowledge on to others through her courses, leadership of outings and her keys (Meg is in effect a natural teacher); Finally, her deep knowledge of trees and botany in general.

 

So a happy 80th birthday, Meg, and here’s to many more!                                          Mark Hyde

 

-xoxox-

 

Several members who were not able to attend Meg’s birthday lunch sent her greetings and tributes:

 

Dearest Meg

While most mortals are allocated three score and ten, your fourscore – according to Psalms – is a reflection of strength. May it last with as much vigour till your letter from the King (don’t worry, we’ll find one) in March 2035! Enjoy the day together with the spirits of all those happy souls (including Paul and so many others of the Tree Society) whose lives we have shared along the way. You are much loved, and not just by me!                                      Kim Damstra

 

A very, very happy birthday to you Meg!! I’ll have a Castle Lite this evening in honour of your birthday.                                        Amanda Mileson

 

Happy Birthday to a giant of Botany! Although we’ve never met, who doesn’t know and admire your name! My tree book is worn out and it’s still my favourite.                      Bruce Eitzen

 

Today is a very special day. Meg Coates Palgrave, one of the great wizards of botany in Zimbabwe celebrates her birthday. Happy, happy birthday Meg.                           Bart Wursten

 

The big Coates Palgrave is a constant companion because it’s such a comprehensive and reliable reference work. Where would we be without it? We salute you Meg.                                                                   Fay Robertson

 

Happy Birthday to dear Meg! Doug and Tempe van de Ruit.

 

Colin Saunders: Please pass on to her our congratulations and best wishes. We hope that you have a splendid celebration in honour of “Mrs Tree”.

 

Rob Jarvis: I am afraid we won’t be able to attend as we have another engagement on that day. Please wish Meg our very best!

 

Dave & Sue Du Plessis: We hope you have a great celebration for Meg’s birthday. Please send her our best wishes.

 

-xoxox-

 

Other members who were present also recollected their interactions with Meg over the years:

 

I am not going to expound on Meg’s botanical achievements and exploits — these will be adequately covered — I just want to thank Meg, my friend of a great many years, for a very special relationship. Meg and I and Tony Ade grew up together at Nyanga — happy days.

 

This lady has amazing stamina, she can out walk most of us and then get back to base where the rest of us will sink into a comfy chair or bed; not Meg, she will down a couple or more beers and set to to so out the day’s collections, everything meticulously recorded and beautifully pressed, then change the papers from the previous day’s collections — only then will she relax with several more beers or red wine. Her quest for knowledge and attention to detail is boundless.

 

Meg has had many curved balls bowled at her over the years and she has fielded each one with typical courage and aplomb — always dealing with trying situations with characteristic determination and courage. She is an enthusiast of note, always ready to share her vast knowledge – but, here I must add, equally, be sure never to ask a “silly” question or not hear an instruction when you are recording for her on a walk!

 

We salute you Meg and wish you many fruitful years ahead and an excellent time with your wonderful family in Kruger. We look forward to Catapu and then lots more walks and treeing and happy times. God bless my friend.

Mary Lovemore

 

I have very fond memories of Paul and Meg.

 

In 1963, when I was still a trainee Medical Laboratory Technologist in Salisbury, I was sent to work for 6 months in the hospital laboratory in Umtali. Paul was my boss and we were the only technologists in the laboratory at that time. Before I arrived, Paul booked me in at the Nurses’ Home where he knew I would be safe and well cared for. When I arrived, Paul and Meg welcomed me warmly. They made it plain to me that their home was always open to me.

 

During my time there, I was able to go home to Salisbury about once a month. Paul or Meg would always provide transport for me to the Umtali Railway Station and back again. On the way back to the Nurses’ Home they would often first take me to their home for a breakfast of fried bacon and eggs as I was too late for breakfast at the Nurses’ Home.

 

I have vague memories of Petri dishes with the chrysalises of butterflies and moths lying around in the home of Paul and Meg. These dishes were all strategically placed in the positions were they would get the optimum conditions of light and warmth. Some of the chrysalises were really beautiful and I was fascinated by them. It would appear that the interest of Paul and Meg shifted from butterflies and moths to trees with the passing of time.

 

My outstanding memory of Paul and Meg is that of a warm, kind, hospitable couple. I would like to thank Meg for all she did for me then when I was a young woman, away from home for the first time. I will never forget it.

 

I wish Meg everything of the best in the years that are left to her. May she enjoy good health, good friends and God’s richest blessings.                                Beryl Ely (nee Cockrell).

 

I have not met another woman who has given me so many hours of pleasure – that is in daylight hours.                                                            JP Felu

 

CABS HEAD OFFICE, HARARE

 

19 APRIL 2015

 

The Tree Society was to have visited Barwick on this day but this was cancelled because of the weather. However the group had its own walk in the grounds of CABS Head office and this is the write-up, by Sarah Roberts, of their activities.

The morning dawned clearer than of late and the brave were all at the CABs head office at ten to eight for a prompt departure to Barwick School. The abundant rain of the last few days had abated temporarily and it looked promising for our expedition to Barwick. We gathered in the car park, all ready to take off at eight, and wondered where our leaders were.

Tony arrived and announced that the message from Dave and Wendy was that it was still raining at our proposed riverine destination out on the Dyke so the outing was cancelled.

Disappointed, we chatted and discussed alternative plans, and Tony having told a joke or two to cheer us up suggested we look at what there was right there in the grounds of CABS. Now THAT was a great solution.

Having cleared with the security guard that it would be in order for us to walk “in the park” we were on our way. Suffice to say we had a lovely walk around the large grounds and found all the trees with which we are familiar, the names of which we gradually remembered as we moved along, indigenous, non-indigenous, newly named, common names, pronunciation discussions, and all the usual repartee which we so enjoy. Our pace was even fairly brisk with the beautiful lawns!

Amazingly, the large munondos remained despite the cultivation and lawns. Which Mahogany were we looking at, then there were more of them, in a thoughtfully planted row, various palms and even some wild life on the other side of the fence!!

The grounds proved extensive, and interesting, and even behind the boundary fence we found so many. We came upon fruit trees, former orchards of the original old houses of the neighbourhood. The Latin names very different from those familiar to us.

The border beds in the gardens thoughtfully planted with small trees, shrubs and flowers to attract birds, bees and butterflies which we saw in abundance. Pretty yellow ducklings and Egyptian geese added to our enjoyment.

At the end of a lovely two hour walk, some went home to work, few of us ended up having coffee or hot chocolate and biscuits on my verandah. Those off to Catapu, and those venturing to the Outward Bound with the Birders had important things to sort. Special time was had by those who found Raintree quiet and beautiful and had their picnic lunches there!

Certainly not a lost day, and thanks to Tony, Bilal, Dean and Teig for their input, and, of course, the odd smattering of botanical knowledge from the rest of us, Graham, Victor, Jan, Mary and myself!

Sarah aka Mickey

Tree List at CABS, Sunday, 19 April 2015.

 

Croton megalocarpus, Acacia galpinii, Syzygium paniculatum – Cerise fruit, Newtonia buchananii, Acacia polyacantha, Acacia abyssinica,

Ulmus parvafolia (China) serrated leaf, Acacia xanthophloea (Fever tree), Senna spectabilis, Ligustrum lucidum – Privet (Japanese), Solanum mauritianum, Leucaena leucocephala,

Toona ciliataCedrela, Psidium guajava, Spathodea campanulata, Celtis africana, Casimiroa edulis – Mexican apple, Vitex payos – Chocolate berry, Triangle Palms, Schefflera arboricola variegata, Strelitizia nicolai, Albizia gummifera, Jacaranda mimosifolia,

Gymnosporia senegalensis – Confetti tree, Julbernardia globiflora – Munondo, Khaya nyasica / K. anthotheca, Rhus lancea – Willow leaf crowberry, Mangifera indica – Mango, Persea americana – Avocado, Morus alba – Mulberry, Acacia polyacantha, Bauhinia variegata, Trichilia emetica – Natal mahogany, Tabebuia chrysotricha – golden yellow flowers, Citharexylum spinosumFiddlewood/ Lady Chancellor, Ficus benjamina – Weeping fig, Phoenix canariensis, Phoenix reclinata

Callistemon viminalis Weeping bottlebrush, Dracaena steudneri, Melaleuca armillaris – Tea tree,

Antidesma vogelianum – Forest tassel berry, Erythrina lysistemon, Cussonia arborea, Acrocarpus fraxinifolius – Kenya coffee shade, Ficus benjamina variegata, Sapindus saponaria- Western soapberry, Adansonia digitata – Baobab, Bolusanthus speciosus – Tree wisteria, Brachystegia spiciformis, Brachystegia boehmii, Eriobotrya japonica – Loquat, Nerium, deadly Oleander,

Abelia, Pyracantha angustifolia, Acalypha galpinii, Acacia sieberiana, Fraxinus americana American ash, Duranta erecta – Golden dew drop or forget-me-not, Kigelia africana – Sausage tree, Cotoneaster sp.

The beautiful Raphia PoolAnt "fishing" for water plants in Njiri (warthog) Pan, described as a temporary pond with sedges.